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Choice- What Comes With It

Choice- What Comes With It

Choice- What Comes With It

Choice is a great gift. What comes with it?

I have a couple of thoughts that have been ruminating inside myself. Maybe they won’t be at all relevant to you, as they are to me. But just in case – here we go:

1. Every thought is a seed. If you plant crab apples, don’t count on harvesting Golden Delicious.

Golden Delicious – Good!

Bill Meyer created this awesome sentence. Faith is a seed. Thoughts are seeds. Choices seem, actually, to be seeds. We’re gonna grow what we plant. So, taking care of this gift of choice would allow us to enjoy a much better harvest.

Digging through negative thoughts is well worth the effort. Tossing them on their ear – burying them far from our mind and heart – counters  a great deal of … stuff… dark and harmful influence, you know?

The aching of body parts, added of flab in places I never knew it could show up, and diminishing energy aside, I love getting older. The pieces of wisdom and influences of goodness settle in more. It’s easier to plant good seeds, more often.

2. But men never violate the laws of God without suffering the consequences sooner or later.

Lydia Child shared that thought. I love it. Just because I don’t know everything [even much more than a particle of truth, here in mortality] now, He does. Laws that govern His universe – the ones that I am aware of – apply to me and my choices. Eventually, there are consequences to take on the chin, so to speak.

We choose not to take a coat when it’s turning cold outside? We’re free to make that choice. But we will still be really cold when the temperatures drop. And that’s just a simple – as – pie example. Others are much more impacting and … well… miserable.

3.  If you can accept that a bad choice carries the seed of its own punishment, why not accept the fact that a good choice yields desirable fruit?

Freedom and Self Worth

Gary R Blair is the writer who shares this thought. I know it’s similar to my number one thought, above. But here’s the thing: I’ve seen that many people seem to have a harder time accepting and embracing good things than hard ones. Our attitude – our acceptance of more good will open us up to more good things and feelings and blessings.

It is tied to our self worth. Forget self-esteem. My personal view is that ‘self esteem’ is tied to outward things like:

I must have this kind of clothes to feel good about myself.

I must lose twenty [or however many] pounds to get back my self esteem.

I need X number more dollars ….

Don’t say anything negative to me, or it will affect my – yes- self esteem.

I realize I may get pounded on this. That’s okay.  Because you can disagree with me, and it’s all good. Here’s my point: Self WORTH comes from inside, based on an understanding that we’re God’s children, He loves us, and we don’t need any of this mortal stuff to recognize our eternal worth.  We are more free to soar, to enjoy the journey, to see the good in ourselves, when we freely accept the worth of our soul.

It also helps in making good choices when we begin to feel our worth. No one can take that from us. We just need to find it. Recognize it. Joy in it. An added bonus is usually an increased ability to make good choices. . . knowing the consequences will follow.

We are so very lucky! And loved. We can increase it, incrementally, as we go. There is goodness in knowing that.

And goodness matters.

 

 

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4 Comments

  1. Vickey, I agree with you 🙂 I was just contemplating this earlier this evening. My house was a mess because I was cleaning out the pantry, when my daughter informed me that her date was on his way to our house…..my hair was in need of grooming, and I really felt terrible about myself. Then I stepped back and realized that you have to sometimes make messes to improve your surroundings.
    My self worth is very much intertwined with my relationship with my Heavenly Father. I am forever grateful for His influence in my life, and the gentle reminders that He Loves me. Thanks Again Vickey!

    Reply
    • Thank you, Trina. I have had many moments of “No! I’ve got to clean up/ fix up/etc” and, like you, am ‘getting’ the principle that the inward matters so much more than the outer. I imagine things went just fine at your house. 🙂

      Like you, I’m grateful for the gentle reminders [you put it in perfect words] that come from our Father. The coolest- and sweetest- choice seems to accept His love for us, doesn’t it? The more completely we do, the better the journey. Not easier, usually… just better. 🙂

      Thanks, Trina.

      Reply
  2. Vickey,

    Thank you for your insightful thoughts. Some of my favorite seeds to plant, are the “seeds of change.” Change allows us to learn from the past, so we can make better choices for the future to receive a better consequence as you indicate. An important part of my book, His Grace Is Sufficient, is how I learned from my past, so I knew what to change, and how I allowed the Savior to lead me in that journey of change and healing. Darla Isackson’s article, “The Connection Between Forgiveness and Freedom,” on the Meridian Magazine web site quotes from my book:

    “Many years ago, I presented a talk titled, ‘Personal and Family Worthiness’ in a local stake priesthood meeting, I talked, in part, of how I changed the direction of our family from my abusive childhood. Our son also was asked to speak on his home life. He shared how he had never been abused, except with too many peanut butter sandwiches.” (Darla Isackson, The Connection Between Forgiveness and Freedom, http://www.ldsmag.com/article/1/11410)

    The vital principle of change is very personal to me; I have spent a lot of time studying, pondering, and praying about this topic. I believe change is tied very closely to repentance or the act of turning away from sin and turning to God.

    I was wondering, if you are talking about unhealthy views of “Self Worth and Self Esteem”? I think healthy views of self worth and self esteem center around knowing we are sons and daughters of God. When we really understand who we are, then we can feel good about ourselves. The Adversary, is the one who tells us the many lies of our “lack” of self worth or self esteem; he is a liar and always has been. We must never believe his lies. Those who suffer a serious lack of self worth or self esteem may require inspired priesthood and/or professional counseling to work through his many lies.

    Thank you again for a wonderful article. Your articles, often cause me to pause and ponder, as it did for me today.

    🙂 Stan

    Reply
    • Thanks for your good words, Stan. Your thoughts are, as usual, wonderful add-ons. Re: esteem and worth. Yes.. I’m with you.

      My concern, and the reason I try to distance myself from ‘esteem’ and seek for ‘worth’, is because of a couple of talks I read/ presentations given regarding our seeking Christ in our countenance – instead of seeing ourselves. The ‘over’ concern for self become secondary to our desire to seek Him. And our worth can never been diluted, regardless of what happens in this world.
      I should have included the concept that, once we are comfortably accepting of our Father’s love, and our Savior’s love, and are working to be more like them, the self worth becomes the umbrella under which other things- like esteem – reside.

      Thank you, Stan!
      Vickey

      Reply

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